Dr Sam Illingworth on the Orinoco Communications Podcast

Shortly after his return from the Conference of Parties (COP24) climate talks in Poland, Dr Sam Illingworth appeared on the Orinoco Communications podcast to talk about climate communication. “How can you talk about climate change without getting angry? Or without getting upset? It’s just not possible” Sam posited to Peter Barker from Orinoco Communications, pointing out that

My Climate Poem

The Climate Communication Project team member, Dr Sam Illingworth, has created a new poem using responses from the MyClimate Twitter campaign that was run by the Priestley International Centre for Climate and Leeds Climate Commission during Green Great Britain Week in Leeds 15-19 October 2018. During this campaign, members of the public tweeted using the

The role of framing and message-tailoring in communicating climate change

Communicating climate change is a tricky business. Giving people facts about, for example, increasing global temperature or rising sea level doesn’t always result in positive changes in behaviour. A different – and perhaps more effective – strategy is to use framing-based approaches and tailor climate messages for different audiences. Framing involves emphasising certain elements of

Communicating the 1.5°C target

International climate negotiations are conducted in the language of headline numbers, such as global average temperatures and calculations of how many more gigatonnes of greenhouse gases remain in our planetary budget. These calculations are essential to setting targets and monitoring progress of different countries in meeting their obligations to international agreements. However, this technical and

Time for a climate communication audit

Over the last decade, the level of interest in climate change communication has grown rapidly – there’s now a huge number of people, organisations and institutions involved in the theory and practice of public engagement. In part, the enthusiasm for public engagement has come from the realisation that without significant and sustained public support, technological